Nov 27 2011

Photo

I joined Amazon.co.uk in October, and am now working on a big project to revamp the browse structure and navigation of the jewellery catalogue. These are exciting days for the relatively young lifestyle consumer catalogue at Amazon - or “softlines”, as they call it - because there is simply so much potential for doing something entirely different from Amazon’s more traditional product lines, like books and music. Stay tuned!

I joined Amazon.co.uk in October, and am now working on a big project to revamp the browse structure and navigation of the jewellery catalogue. These are exciting days for the relatively young lifestyle consumer catalogue at Amazon - or “softlines”, as they call it - because there is simply so much potential for doing something entirely different from Amazon’s more traditional product lines, like books and music. Stay tuned!


Nov 27 2011

Photoset

Last month, I presented my idea for the design of a mobile ambient display to visually represent multiple social media feeds to the very wonderful Fjord London. The project brief specified the problem of prioritising and filtering the constant flow of information from these multiple feeds - and this was my proposed solution. I’d also hand sketched every slide - thought it would be a good opportunity to practice representing ideas more visually. Plus I love sketching, so it was great fun!


Aug 31 2011

Photo

I am currently working on my dissertation with The Guardian, exploring new user testing strategies for their mobile news applications, like the iPhone and Android apps. 
This photo diary study is one of the pieces of user research carried out to gather anecdotal feedback and gain insight into the way readers of The Guardian access news on their mobile devices. This study is particularly useful for identifying where users tend to read the news on their mobile devices, and how much attention is usually given to consuming this news.
This study was also relatively simple to conduct. It was held over a period of one week with 10 readers, who were asked to capture a photo of their environment whenever they accessed The Guardian news on their mobile devices. The cameras on these devices made this particularly easy, as well as the notes application for tapping out quick thoughts and comments in situ.
This is currently still a work in progress. Feel free to send any questions my way.
Go to The Guardian photo diary study blog.

I am currently working on my dissertation with The Guardian, exploring new user testing strategies for their mobile news applications, like the iPhone and Android apps. 

This photo diary study is one of the pieces of user research carried out to gather anecdotal feedback and gain insight into the way readers of The Guardian access news on their mobile devices. This study is particularly useful for identifying where users tend to read the news on their mobile devices, and how much attention is usually given to consuming this news.

This study was also relatively simple to conduct. It was held over a period of one week with 10 readers, who were asked to capture a photo of their environment whenever they accessed The Guardian news on their mobile devices. The cameras on these devices made this particularly easy, as well as the notes application for tapping out quick thoughts and comments in situ.

This is currently still a work in progress. Feel free to send any questions my way.

Go to The Guardian photo diary study blog.


Aug 30 2011

Photoset

I’m currently doing my dissertation with The Guardian, and one of the main objectives is to observe their current user testing methods and identify new strategies that can be implemented.

User testing mobile applications is always problematic, because 1) asking someone to sit down in front of you in a room and show you how they use the app is nowhere near their natural interaction with it, and 2) the environment simply doesn’t elicit natural mobile usage behaviour, with ambient distractions and sporadic bursts of attention.

We mainly focused on the issues of recruitment and environment, and implemented little tweaks in the process along the way, including when user testing was done in the product life cycle. Post test surveys were also sent out to compare the feedback.

The user tests were fairly informal, and involve a laptop with the silverback app for recording the user’s face, and a flipcam to record the user’s interaction. 

Another important thing I have also learned along the way is that a free cup of coffee goes a long way.

[Image sources: currybet.net, osx.iusethis.com/app/silverback]


Aug 07 2011
16 notes

Photo

The following storyboards and UI designs were created for an assignment for my Interaction Design module, in which we had to design a portable self-check out device for a hardware store. 
The project follows the entire life cycle of product development up to the point of prototyping, and involves data collection, analysis, requirements gathering, the creation of personas, scenarios, storyboards and use cases, alternative designs and evaluation. 
This first diagram is an HTA (hierarchical task analysis) of the initial design of the self check out device.

The following storyboards and UI designs were created for an assignment for my Interaction Design module, in which we had to design a portable self-check out device for a hardware store.

The project follows the entire life cycle of product development up to the point of prototyping, and involves data collection, analysis, requirements gathering, the creation of personas, scenarios, storyboards and use cases, alternative designs and evaluation. 

This first diagram is an HTA (hierarchical task analysis) of the initial design of the self check out device.


Aug 07 2011
5 notes

Photoset

These are some examples of the storyboards we sketched out using the personas we had created for the self check out device.


Aug 07 2011

Photo

This is one of the personas we developed for our storyboards and scenarios. This exercise was particularly useful in identifying and correcting assumptions with language and technological proficiency.
Name: Mr Ricky Chen
Age: 64
Background: Mr Chen is originally from Hong Kong, but he and his wife moved to the UK 10 years ago to be with his son and his family in Kent. Mr Chen used to be owner and head chef of a successful restaurant back in Hong Kong, but has since retired after moving to the UK. For the past 10 years, he has been helping out at a friend’s small Chinese bakery on an ad-hoc basis, more for the social structure rather than financial necessity. He mostly potters about in the garden, practices Qi Gong, takes care of his 2 grandchildren (granddaughter 3, grandson, 5), and does most of the cooking at home. He is also quite a keen DIY man, and does all the home repairs and lends a hand at his friend’s bakery installing fittings, lights, etc. He’s also heavily involved in the Chinese Cultural Society, and likes organising cultural trips and events for other Chinese immigrants in Kent.
Language: He speaks mainly Cantonese and Chinese, with only basic English. He had never spoken English before arriving in the UK, and never had any need to learn the language very well as most of his friends and family speak Cantonese and Chinese.
Computer skills: The only piece of technology he personally owns is a Nokia mobile phone – no touch screen, and not a smartphone. He doesn’t use the computer, although his son has tried to show him how to send emails once or twice, but Mr Chen doesn’t see a need to use it. He drives and doesn’t usually take the tube, so he doesn’t often come into contact with a touch screen ticketing machine.
Physical: He is perfectly healthy except for weakening eyesight and a history of back problems – can’t lift heavy objects.

This is one of the personas we developed for our storyboards and scenarios. This exercise was particularly useful in identifying and correcting assumptions with language and technological proficiency.

Name: Mr Ricky Chen

Age: 64

Background: Mr Chen is originally from Hong Kong, but he and his wife moved to the UK 10 years ago to be with his son and his family in Kent. Mr Chen used to be owner and head chef of a successful restaurant back in Hong Kong, but has since retired after moving to the UK. For the past 10 years, he has been helping out at a friend’s small Chinese bakery on an ad-hoc basis, more for the social structure rather than financial necessity. He mostly potters about in the garden, practices Qi Gong, takes care of his 2 grandchildren (granddaughter 3, grandson, 5), and does most of the cooking at home. He is also quite a keen DIY man, and does all the home repairs and lends a hand at his friend’s bakery installing fittings, lights, etc. He’s also heavily involved in the Chinese Cultural Society, and likes organising cultural trips and events for other Chinese immigrants in Kent.

Language: He speaks mainly Cantonese and Chinese, with only basic English. He had never spoken English before arriving in the UK, and never had any need to learn the language very well as most of his friends and family speak Cantonese and Chinese.

Computer skills: The only piece of technology he personally owns is a Nokia mobile phone – no touch screen, and not a smartphone. He doesn’t use the computer, although his son has tried to show him how to send emails once or twice, but Mr Chen doesn’t see a need to use it. He drives and doesn’t usually take the tube, so he doesn’t often come into contact with a touch screen ticketing machine.

Physical: He is perfectly healthy except for weakening eyesight and a history of back problems – can’t lift heavy objects.


Aug 07 2011

Photoset

These are the wireframes of the various pages for the portable hand held check out device we created.


Aug 07 2011
5 notes

Photoset

These are the wireframes of the various pages for the portable hand held check out device.


Aug 07 2011
1 note

Photoset

These were the initial UI designs for the self check out device, created using Adobe Illustrator. 


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